The Worth of Online Data in National Security
Govciooutlook

The Worth of Online Data in National Security

Catalina Joseph, Gov CIO Outlook | Friday, May 07, 2021

AI applications in defense depend on training data from a diversity of inputs. These can contain technical cybersecurity feeds, data from physical sensors in the field, or aerial photography.

FREMONT, CA: Today, Artificial intelligence (AI) is leading precedence for government and defense globally, one that a few countries consider the new global arms race. AI can aid several national and international security initiatives, from logistics to cybersecurity and counter-terrorism.

The overwhelming quantity of public data available online is central for supporting a number of these use cases. These sources comprise unstructured social media data from the fringe and mainstream platforms, including deep and dark web data. Below is how public online data support AI and national security and how these feeds can more efficiently meet defense needs for AI expansion.

AI and national security: The Price of Online Data

AI applications in defense depend on training data from a diversity of inputs. These can contain technical cybersecurity feeds, data from physical sensors in the field, or aerial photography. From these accessible databases, data scientists can develop Machine Learning (ML) models that mechanically detect cyberattacks, direct autonomous vehicles, monitor on-the-ground enemy activity, and notify plenty of other national security strategies.

Publicly available online information, explicitly from social and dark web sources, is progressively valuable for supporting several AI applications in defense. For instance:

Communication channels over the deep and dark web often signal targeted cybersecurity threats, such as coordinated malware attacks or leaked classified data. Merging these sources with technical feeds like network traffic data generates a more robust AI and national security approach for addressing cyber risks.

From mainstream social channels to fringe sites, numerous online spaces are used by extremist groups globally to plant disinformation, recruit, and plan vehement attacks. ML models are now desired to monitor online extremism, as its growth and complication techniques are surpassing existing detection algorithms and human analysis. Additionally, AI can help trace deliberately obfuscated chatter and imminent threat indicators, such as manifestos and planned attacks.

Foreign nation-states employ AI to conduct data warfare, both domestically and abroad. On the contrary, military technology, such as AI, helps monitor these targeted disinformation threats for smart applications.

For a few military operations, AI aids more robust command and control systems that analyze data feed from several domains in a centralized display. Cross-referencing data points from online social and dark web sources facilitate defense analysts to get more worth from other feeds, develop AI functionality, and insistently monitor environments more effectively.

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